October 27, 2006

Candy Bowl

Filed under: Foodz,Youth Rights — Katrina @ 9:44 pm

Two weeks ago, I decided it would be nice to have a nice big candy bowl on my desk at work. Picked up four bags of candy from grocery store, found a big bowl in the kitchen at work, and filled it with the Reese’s cups, Kit Kats, Snickers, and 3 Musketeers I had just purchased. My desk is right up front there, so it would be a nice treat for passers by. I’m just cool like that.

You know what? It went over nicely. Some remarks I got were interesting. My boss kept telling me the candy was evil (while taking one). At least three people wondered how I could sit there all day with this big ass candy bowl in front of me and not eat all of it. Others “complained” that putting that candy there was just going to make them fat.

It was a Friday I first put out the candy, and the bowl was empty by Tuesday. So Wednesday morning, I picked up four more bags and refilled the bowl. Candy didn’t disappear quite as quickly now, but it was still going. It’s been over a week, and that batch is about finished.

So. Wondering why this entry is under the Youth Rights category when youth have yet to be mentioned? Well, I’ll get to that now.

I’m 23 and am by several years the youngest person there. Most of my coworkers are over 40. Men just barely outnumber women. As a whole, anyone coming by and taking from that bowl, which included coworkers as well as package delivery folks, random visitors, and even people who worked in other labs on the same floor, weren’t what you’d call youth, and certainly not what you’d call kids.

And that candy was still gone in three days (remembering nobody was there Saturday and Sunday).

That’s right. We’ve stumbled on yet another double standard. If I worked in a high school instead of a small biomedical research lab, I’d catch a lot of heat for having a bowl of candy on my desk. God forbid “kids” are aware that candy exists, especially in a “take all you want” scenario. Nope. You’ve got to restrict that stuff until they’re 18. And do they grow up to be then? They grow up to be the candy hogs like the ones I work with!

And this begs another question. I was asked commonly how I was able to “control myself” and not gulp down every last piece in that bowl. Well, any number of things could have contributed to this. For one, I don’t eat what I don’t feel like eating at the moment. Not a tricky concept there. I’m not all “OMFG!!! Candy! Munch, munch, munch, munch…”

Then I consider another thing. Growing up, candy and other sweets weren’t particularly kept away. There were some restrictions here and there, but in my house growing up, there was usually some kind of candy around. Got candy at Halloween, Christmas, Easter, and other times. Other treats, too. Cookies. Cake. Ice cream. Brownies. Good stuff!

But in a somewhat “take as much as you want” situation, I learned a couple of things. One, eating too much gives you a stomach ache. Heh. For that, parents should LET kids eat too many sweets and get that stomach ache they warn them about. That works way better than just hiding it saying “It’ll give you a stomach ache!” Two, a simple fact. When you eat all of something, you don’t have it anymore. Can’t just get more. You have to wait until we go to the store again, and even then, that’s if we feel like buying it. So you learn not to eat it all right away. What if you want it later? Then you won’t have it.

And at work, I placed this unrestricted candy bowl in a situation accessible only to working adults, and look how fast it went. The company CEO grabbed a piece EVERY time he walked by. And he walks by a lot. Sure, everyone had this sort of guilty smirk whenever they took a piece, like doing so was wrong or something.

Got to love the “you’re making me fat” remarks. As if I were forcing the candy down their throats. Or they otherwise were not choosing to take the candy that was sitting there. Like they couldn’t resist. Candy! They can’t resist candy.

And did I mention these people are adults?

10 Comments

  1. Figures. Adults accusing youth of doing things that they do themselves.

    Comment by Luke — October 28, 2006 @ 1:41 am

  2. No, they’re just worried because childhood obesity is a problem and adult obesity isn’t.

    Oh, wait? What’s that? The percentage of adults who are overweight is 4 times higher than the percentage of children?

    Comment by Stefan — October 28, 2006 @ 8:42 am

  3. I hate candy. Except for anything with the words “Reese’s Peanut Butter” on the package. Those fuckin’ “peanut butter pumpkins” they have out now are THA SHIT!

    Comment by Galen — October 28, 2006 @ 1:39 pm

  4. Tragedy of the commons. Common enviromental problem. People will exploit any rescource they aren’t responsible for.

    Comment by Zach — October 28, 2006 @ 5:15 pm

  5. Ha. My English teacher has this little bowl of candy at her desk. Kids can take some anytime, and she does, too. It only takes about half a big bag, though. And guess what? It last all day.

    Comment by Conor — October 29, 2006 @ 9:04 am

  6. I live in a household currently where we don’t eat too much candy and desserts. Not because it’s limited, but because we just don’t feel like wolfing it down. I’m 13. Since Halloween I’ve had about five peices of candy. Over the last few days. I’ve had a huge amount of candy sitting in front of me, why don’t I eat it?

    However, I disagree with schools providing candy to younger students (middle school, elementary school). Mainly because its used in a reward setting – “If you get good grades, you can have a candy!” – and because children of that age would not limit themselves if they had an allergy or if the parents forbid candy, as they often do at that age because it makes young children hyper.

    Comment by Samantha — November 2, 2006 @ 7:47 am

  7. I can see kindergarteners not knowing they should limit themselves, but upper elementary school and middle school, yeah they would. Especially if there’s an allergy. When I was in elementary school, the kids with chocolate or nut allergies knew to stay away from the stuff. It was very rare one didn’t, and even then, it was by accident, usually because whoever gave them the item didn’t bother to say what was in it.

    And screw the parents who forbid candy. Those parents are retarded. What are they afraid of? Kid will get a stomach ache from eating too much? If kid eats too much candy and gets a stomach ache, he won’t be eating too much candy again, of his own volition! That works way better.

    And young children are hyper anyway. It’s natural. And they need the sugar. It’s part of their development. Just because parents seem to not understand why their young children are acting like, oh, young children, doesn’t mean the kids themselves are doing anything wrong. Maybe if they’d learn to let them outside once in a while? But another rant entirely. Stay tuned!

    Comment by Katrina — November 2, 2006 @ 8:22 pm

  8. “And screw the parents who forbid candy. Those parents are retarded. What are they afraid of? Kid will get a stomach ache from eating too much? If kid eats too much candy and gets a stomach ache, he won’t be eating too much candy again, of his own volition! That works way better.”

    Yeah, I wonder why people don’t do that. There’s also the concern of cavities, but if the kids brush their teeth and learn to eat sugary foods in moderation then there shouldn’t be a problem.

    “And young children are hyper anyway. It’s natural. And they need the sugar. It’s part of their development. Just because parents seem to not understand why their young children are acting like, oh, young children, doesn’t mean the kids themselves are doing anything wrong. Maybe if they’d learn to let them outside once in a while?”

    Well, yeah. There was a whole thing about kindergardeners being given ADHD medication by their parents when in all reality they are just really hyperactive at that age. And part of my reason for disagreeing with even older kids having the candy is sometimes they don’t even know they have an allergy to something, and even if it was a mistake the school could get sued.

    Comment by Samantha — November 3, 2006 @ 9:07 am

  9. Everyone my mom works with is overwieght. The Gym needs to be peoples friend.

    Comment by Craig — February 6, 2007 @ 11:13 pm

  10. This reminds me of a video game craze I went through from ages 6 to about 12. My father wouldn’t let me play video games, so after he died, I became addicted to them.

    Comment by JerseyJ — October 2, 2008 @ 3:35 pm

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